About the song

Released in 1980 on Twitty’s album Rest Your Love on Me, the song took on a new life the following year when he re-recorded it as a duet with the legendary Loretta Lynn for their album Two’s a Party. This version, the one most familiar to listeners today, became a chart-topping sensation, reaching number two on the Billboard Hot Country Singles chart.

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But I Still Believe In Waltzes is more than just a chart-topper. It’s a nostalgic ode to a simpler time, a celebration of old-fashioned values, and a testament to the enduring power of love. The song opens with a lone fiddle, its mournful melody setting the stage for a story about a couple navigating the complexities of a relationship.

Loretta Lynn, as the female protagonist, expresses reservations about a love that feels too fast-paced and modern. She longs for the days of courtship, where waltzes were the currency of affection and commitment was a slow dance, not a quick fling.

Conway Twitty, with his signature smooth voice, enters as the reassuring counterpoint. He doesn’t dismiss her concerns; instead, he sings of his unwavering belief in the timeless beauty of waltzes and the enduring power of love songs. “I still believe in waltzes, and girls with old fashioned ways,” he croons, his voice a warm embrace against the anxieties of the modern world. The lyrics paint a picture of a bygone era, where romance unfolded at a slower pace, fueled by stolen glances and whispered promises under the moonlight.

I Still Believe In Waltzes is more than just a love song, though. It’s a commentary on a changing society. The “modern ways” Lynn sings about represent a shift in cultural values, a move away from tradition and towards a more transient way of life. Twitty, through his unwavering belief in waltzes, becomes a symbol of a generation clinging to the values they hold dear.

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The duet format between Twitty and Lynn adds another layer of depth to the song. Their contrasting vocals, his smooth and hers twangy, perfectly embody the push and pull of a relationship. Lynn represents the voice of caution, the one hesitant to rush into the unknown. Twitty is the voice of reassurance, the one who believes in the enduring power of their love. Together, they create a beautiful tapestry of emotions, a testament to the complexities of love and commitment.

I Still Believe In Waltzes is a song that transcends time. It’s a reminder that even in the face of a changing world, the core values of love, respect, and commitment remain constant. It’s a song that makes you want to dust off your dancing shoes, find a partner, and lose yourself in the beauty of a slow waltz. So, put on your favorite pair of boots, turn up the volume, and let Conway Twitty and Loretta Lynn transport you to a simpler time, where love still dances to the rhythm of a waltz.

Video

Lyrics

“I Still Believe In Waltzes”

I pushed him away and carefully said I’m just not that kinda girl
You might think I’m square
But you’ve been around in the ways of the world
I know that making is taking for granted
Its all easy come, easy go
He pulled me close, whispered, now darlin’ there’s something I want you to know

I still believe in waltzes, and girls with old fashioned ways
I still believe in love songs, in the good, in the good ole days
I’ve always liked happy endings, somebody’s dream coming true
I still believe in waltzes and dancing the last one with you

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He slipped into bed, I turned over and said
I’m worried your working so late
Is it just your job
that keeps you away, Lord
I know the temptations are gray
I’m just a wife, I’m just a momma
Its not too exciting I know
He pulled me close and whispered those same words that night long ago

I still believe in waltzes, and girls with old fashioned ways
I still believe in love songs, in the good, in the good ole days
I’ve always liked happy endings, somebody’s dream coming true
I still believe in waltzes and dancing the last one with you

We still believe in waltzes…